Friday, November 25, 2016

How to update your multilingual product catalog for 2017

The year comes to an end once more (as the years pass, it seems it is disturbingly faster, right?), and the time has come to update the yearly product catalog again. In all those languages it comes in, and hopefully, some more – since everyone wants to expand internationally. Your best choice is to entrust a professional language service provider, but even then there are things to watch to make sure the process will run smoothly.

How to update your multilingual product catalog for 2017 and keep your sanity?
Source: AdobeStock.com

If you keep just 3 things in mind this year, those 2017 multilingual updates won't turn into a nightmare. Read on and enjoy:


1. Have your translation resources revised before you reuse them. If you don't have any, you should get them created (see how to create translation memory here).

Translation resources consist mainly of translation memories and glossaries (translation memory explained in detail here). These are databases of already translated text, which significantly reduce translation cost and delivery times when applied in translation, mainly in case of repetitive content – which surely applies to product catalogs. 
The translation resources, however, degenerate over time if not maintained and properly updated. They need to be checked from time to time because any errors detected in the resources will propagate into all future translations. Or in plain words: You don't want to have the same typos in a catalog 3 years in a row... 

2. Ask for a price estimate including a pre-translation analysis. Don't pay for repetitive, or already translated content.

As explained above, having a good part of content already translated before and processed in form of translation resources logically reduces both translation time and translation cost. Your supplier shouldn't charge the same for repetitive or exact match content, and the price tag on your translation project needs to reflect this. Therefore always ask your translation supplier to provide you with a translation estimate that contains a detailed analysis of reused content and check how this affects the final price. 


3. Always insist on having the translated content reviewed and proofread.

Humans make mistakes, and machines programmed by humans make mistakes too. Until the day comes when AI takes over translation, it's always a healthy idea to review translated documents before they are published. Especially with technical content, it can be critical not to overlook mistakes (e.g. a translator confusing "always push this button" with "never push this button") or else such mistakes can end up as very unpleasant lawsuits. For this reason, demand that your texts not only be translated, but also fully reviewed and edited by a second native translator, and then as a final step proofread by humans with computer-assisted checkers. By the way, it's also good to make sure your translation supplier holds indemnity insurance - just in case...




That's it. The issues are clear, the process is given, but if it sounds as too much to handle, just leave the job to us. We specialize in technical translation and we're experts on catalogs, manuals, and guidelines. 


Order your translation now, or contact our project coordinators for further information and enjoy the Happy Holidays – this time stress-free.









Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Language facts: Slovenian

Slovenian (or Slovene) is a Slavic language from the South Slavic group, most closely related to Croatian and a distant relative of languages such as Russian. Slovenian should NOT be confused with the Slovak language, which does not have much in common with Slovenian, apart from both being Slavic languages. Interestingly, both languages call their own language by the same expression – slovensky/i, sloven(s)cina – which literally means Slavic in the old Slavonian. Slovenian is spoken by about 2 million people in Slovenia – a small country, but with both high mountains (Alps) and a sea (the Adriatic sea), as well as Slovenian communities in neighboring countries and immigrants around the world. Slovenian is also an official EU language.

Church in the middle of Lake Bled, Slovenia.
Source: AdobeStock.com

The least homogeneous Slavic language

Slovenian is a heavily inflected language with some ancient grammatical peculiarities, such as the dual grammatical number. Despite the small number of speakers, the dialects are heavily diversified and strong dialects from opposite sides of the country, influenced by neighboring languages, are practically mutually unintelligible. This was due to the fact that compulsory schooling was in other languages than Slovenian (mainly German and Italian). Standardized Slovenian as a national language was formed in the 18th century based on the Upper and Lower Carnolian dialects. 


Alphabet

Slovenian uses the Latin alphabet, without the letters Q, X, Y, W and with the addition of a few extra letters. The letters Q, X, Y, W, however, are used as independent letters in encyclopedias and dictionary listings (and as such are included in the alphabet here). 



A B C Č Ć D Đ E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S Š T U V W X Y Z Ž
a b c č ć d đ e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s š t u v w x y z ž