Monday, January 8, 2018

Language facts: Finnish

Finnish is a member of the Finno-Ugric language family (Uralic languages) and is closely related to Estonian and Saami (also known as Lapp). It is one of the two official languages in Finland (the other being Swedish) as well as one of the official EU languages. Additionally, it is used by Finnish-speaking minorities in Sweden and Estonia. The majority (more than 90%) of Finland’s population speaks Finnish, while the remainder speaks Swedish and Sami. Overall, Finnish is spoken by a little more than 5 million people.
Thanks to the existence of Nordic Language Convention, Finnish-speaking citizens can interact with governments and official bodies in other Nordic countries in their native language.

Helsinki - the Capital of Finland
Source: AdobeStock.com

A language with a few relatives but many phonemes

Finnish is related also to some other of the few Uralic languages (such as Hungarian for example) in many aspects, including shared morphology, similar grammar, as well as basic vocabulary. The origin of Uralic languages is not entirely clear even today, but the most widely accepted theory is that this branch originated in the boreal forests around the Ural mountains and around the middle Volga river. Actually, Uralic languages, such as Finnish, are believed to be the proto-language of the area.

The Finnish language gained its official status no sooner than in 1863, after the rise of the Finnish nationalistic movement. The first Finnish writing system was, however, created already in the 16th century by a Finnish bishop Mikael Agricola, who wanted to translate the Bible, and thus needed to standardize the Finnish dialects into a comprehensive system. He failed to do so, as he wasn't able to unify the signs with different phonemes (the intent was for each phoneme to have a corresponding one letter). Later, Finnish actually lost several phonemes from the standardized language due to this unification.



Alphabet

In the Finnish alphabet, 'Å’ is carried over from the Swedish alphabet and is redundant in Finnish; it is merely retained for writing Finland-Swedish proper names. 
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V X Y Z Å Ä Ö

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v x y z å ä ö

Friday, December 22, 2017

We wish you a successful new year!






Our production center runs no matter what. 
If you fight with end-of-the-year deadlines, our language factory is open for you even between the Christmas and New Year's festivities.
We will help you with last minute changes to your multilingual 2018 catalog or website and of course also with any express translation need.
Are you an LSP with a need to cover more volume or delicate language combinations? We can provide full LSP Back-office services for you.
Just go to our e-shop that runs 24/7.


日本のお客様へ(2017年度 年末年始の営業のご案内
平素は格別のお引立てに預かり厚く御礼申し上げます。
年末年始の営業につきましてお知らせいたします。
年末は12/28(木)17時まで通常通り業務を行います。
年始は1/9(火)10時より業務を開始いたします。
12月後半のご依頼につきましては、誠に恐縮ではございますが従来の迅速な業務処理の対
応がとりにくい状況となります。
詳しくはこちらをご覧ください。
新年も変わらぬご愛顧のほど、何卒よろしくお願い申し上げます。

イディオマ株式会社 東京事務所



Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Thank you for meeting idioma @ 27th JTF Translation Festival in Tokyo

2017年11月29日、アルカディア市ヶ谷にて開催されました第27回JTF翻訳祭に出展いたし
ました。




弊社のブースでは、今年新たに取得したISO18587を含む3つの国際規格に準拠した翻訳サ
ービスについてご紹介させていただきました。翻訳でお困りのことがございましたら、何
かしら弊社がお力になれれば幸いです。
また、翻訳祭では普段なかなかお会いできないお客様とご挨拶できるのも嬉しいかぎりで
ございます。弊社ブースにお越しくださった皆様に、この場を借りて改めて御礼申し上げ
ます。

短い時間でのご説明となってしまいましたので、至らなかった点も多々あるかと存じます
。ご不明な点などございましたら、お気軽にsales@idioma.comまでお問い合わせください




We would like to thank everyone for visiting our booth at the JTF Translation Festival 2017 in Tokyo on November 29.
idioma introduced its core ISO:17100, ISO:9001 and ISO:18587 certified translation
services. We enjoyed meeting you and were happy to greet visitors, both new and old, some of whom we haven’t seen in a while.


Please do not hesitate to contact us at sales@idioma.com if you have questions or would like further information.

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

idioma sponsoring Translators without borders in 2018

Tokyo/Prague, (November 7, 2017) – idioma, an international translation services provider based in Tokyo since 1980, is pleased to announce that it has once again pledged its support to help humanitarian translations reach more people around the world by becoming a bronze sponsor of Translators without Borders.





Translators without Borders (TWB) strives to provide people access to vital, often life-saving, information in their own language by connecting non-profit organizations with a community of professional translators, building local language translation capacity, and raising awareness of language barriers. The organization has responded to urgent crises by using its Words of Relief model, working with partners, to provide vital information in the appropriate languages to those affected by the European refugee crisis, the Ebola crisis and the Nepal earthquake. 

Commenting on idioma’s decision to become a sponsor, Steen Carlsson, the managing director of idioma’s Production center, said:
“Having worked with languages all my life, in my job and privately, I know what the difference of even the most rudimentary translation can mean to a person unable to communicate. When those you communicate with do not understand what you say, or what you need, or why you behave the way you do, there is only despair. Translators without Borders is a concept we are happy to support and it is my sincere hope more people in need will benefit from their help.”

idioma is proud to be supporting Translators without Borders in this work.


More about Translators without Borders


Translators without Borders envisions a world where knowledge knows no language barriers. The US-based non-profit provides people access to vital knowledge in their language by partnering with humanitarian organizations. Originally founded in 1993 in France as Traducteurs sans Frontières (now its sister organization), Translators without Borders translates more than five million words per year. In 2012, the organization established a Healthcare Translator Training Center in Nairobi, Kenya. For more information and to volunteer or donate, please visit the TWB website or follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

Monday, November 6, 2017

Newsletter 2018

イディオマのニュースレター2018年版が完成いたしました。
翻訳祭などでこれからお会いできます皆様には、順次お配りさせていただく予定です。
こちらからデータのダウンロードも可能となっておりますので、お時間のある時に是非ご
覧ください。

トピックス
・ポストエディットの国際規格、ISO18587認証を取得
・日本ものづくりワールド2017に出展
・国際規格に沿った翻訳サービスの提供
・追加翻訳の予算が取れないのですが?
・翻訳についての質問
・言語のいろは セルビア語
・スタッフ紹介
・あとがき

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

idioma @ 27th JTF Translation Festival in Tokyo



「第27回JTF翻訳祭に出展します」
2017年11月29日、アルカディア市ヶ谷にて開催される第27回JTF翻訳祭に出展いたします

翻訳業界最大規模である同イベントへの出展も毎年恒例となりましたが、今年は企業出展スペースである翻訳プラザが拡大されており、さらなる盛況が期待されます。

私どものブースでは、今年初出展いたしました設計・製造ソリューション展での展示をベースに、3つのISO国際規格に準じた各種翻訳サービスを出展する予定です。

弊社が出展いたします翻訳プラザへの入場は無料となっており、事前登録も不要です。
その他プログラムでは、一部お申し込みが必要なものもございます。
詳しくはJTF翻訳祭の公式サイトをご覧ください。

ご多用中の折とは存じますが、皆様のご来場を心よりお待ちしております。

開催概要
第27回JTF翻訳祭内
翻訳プラザ
会期:2017年11月29日(水) 9:00~17:30
会場:アルカディア市ヶ谷 3階 富士の間.









idioma @ 27th JTF Translation Festival in Tokyo

On November 29, 2017 idioma will exhibit at the JTF Translation Festival held at Arcadia Ichigaya in Tokyo. The JTF Translation Festival is Japan’s largest annual exhibition for translators and LSPs.

idioma plans to introduce its core ISO:17100, ISO:9001 and ISO:18587 certified translation servicesAdmission to the corporate exhibition space is free and registration is not necessary. We look forward to seeing you there!

If you have any questions please email us at info@idioma.jp.

Exhibition details:
Date: November 29 (Wed), 2017 9:00~17:30
Venue: Arcadia Ichigaya, Tokyo
Our booth: “Fuji” Hall 3F
Website: https://www.jtf.jp/festival/festival_top.do



Friday, September 29, 2017

Languages of Spain's separatist regions: Basque and Catalan

Over the course of history, languages and their evolution have proven to be an accelerator of brawls between nations, as language happens to be the one common denominator for different groups inhabiting the same area that we actually call a nation. Language is an identification mark of affiliation and there are still languages in Europe that bear the nation-building agenda, even in 2017. Examples of such languages are those of Basque and Catalan, the Spain's rebellious regions. 

Basque language

Basque is a language spoken by people in a geographic area in northeastern Spain stretching into parts of southwestern France. Over the past centuries, this region has contracted. Recently, as a result of the Basque nationalistic movement, the language has made a slight comeback. Basque is, in fact, a rather interesting language, as it is an isolated language and is not even remotely similar to any known existing language in the world. Presumably, Basque happens to be one of the few pre-Indo-European languages, the only one remaining in use in Western Europe. 

Basque lands
Source: AdobeStock.com
Several dialects of Basque exist, however, the main dialect is Euskara Batua, a standard introduced in the 1960s that is generally taught in Basque schools. Basque is spoken by a little less than one million people. The language has co-official status in the Basque regions  of Spain, but has no official status in the French regions. 
During the era of Francoist Spain, the language was reluctantly tolerated in the Basque regions that supported the uprising of Franco, yet frowned-upon in those regions where the uprising gained little support.



Alphabet
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N Ñ O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n ñ o p q r s t u v w x y z

Areas of Basque and Catalan speakers in Spain
Source: AdobeStock.com

Catalan language

Catalan is a Romance language with somewhere between 9 and 10 million speakers, but not necessarily native. It is the official language of Andorra and enjoys co-official status in a few Spanish communities, mainly on Spain's east coast, among others in Valencia, where it is called Valencian, or in the Balearic Islands. Similar to Spanish, Catalan also originates from Vulgar Latin. It reached its golden era in medieval times, particularly the Low Middle Ages, when it spread through the Mediterranean. It was used as an official language even in Sicily (until the 15th century) and Sardinia (until the 17th century), while the city of Alghero in Sardinia still tends to use Catalan until the present day. 

The decline of Catalan, that in fact still continues, can be traced back to a specific historical event, the union of Castille and Aragon crowns in 1479, which caused an increasing influence of Spanish in the region. Yet another blow came in 1659, when the northern parts of the Catalonia region was ceded to France. Not only did the language come under the influence of French, it was even drastically prohibited from public use, with efforts to revive Catalan literature coming no sooner than in the half of 19th century. 
The language was banned in use yet again during the Francoist era and has been recognized as an official language only after Spain's transition to democracy. 

Barcelona, Catalan, Spain
Source: AdobeStock.com

Nowadays, there are efforts to revive the language, among others by the French General Council of Pyrénées-Orientales (who introduced Catalan as one of the official languages of the department), to further promote it in public life and education. This seems to be necessary, as statistical research showed a quite dramatic decline of the population in the Catalan region that self-identifies primarily with Catalan (from 44.3% in 2003 to only 36.4% in 2013), which is believed to be caused by immigration, mainly from Arabic-speaking countries. A share of Catalonia's annual budget is poured into promoting the use of Catalan and integration of newcomers. Another issue is that the Catalan-speakers are actually becoming extinct and outside Catalonia itself the language is being replaced by the stronger national languages such as Spanish, French and Italian. 


Alphabet
Catalan uses the Latin alphabet and uses acute accents (é, í, ó, ú) as well as grave accents (à, è, ò).

A B C Ç D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
a b c ç d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z